Why visit Teufelsberg Field Station

An excursion up the Devil’s Mountain, which is essentially 12 million cubic meters of WW2 rubble now overgrown with forest, is well worth the hike. On the summit of Teufelsberg stands an eccentric relic of Berlin’s divided past, Teufelsberg Spy Station, where the NSA would eavesdrop on those east of the wall. Abandoned since the end of the Cold War and suffering from extensive decay and vandalism, the complex features an extraordinary array of large bulbous white globes, called ‘radomes’, perched a top multistory historical buildings filled with artistic graffiti. The echo in the top of the highest dome is so strong, every foot step and word is reiterated. Teufelsberg elevated platforms also offer an incomparable panoramic view of Berlin’s skyline.

Probably the most amazing and unique place in berlin. Make sure you visit / sneak into the old abandoned military station. Climb the tower for the perfect view of Berlin and the best Berlin street art.

Jannes, 29 Aug 2012, Austria
Star-fullStar-fullStar-fullStar-fullStar-half

from 1 review

Free tour

Alternative Berlin Free Walking Tour

Focusing on Berlin’s underground culture, this 3 hour free walking tour explores the lesser known sights and neighbourhoods. Ideal for those seeking to mix with the local lifestyle.


Teufelsberg Field Station history

The Creation of Berlin Teufelsberg

The man-made rubble mound named Teufelsberg came into being after the Second World War. While many artificial hills were heaped up from the debris of West Berlin, Teufelsberg is unique by what is buried underneath; the never completed Nazi military technical college Wehrtechnische Fakultät, the beginnings as what was to be Welthauptstadt Germania (World Capital Germania). Despite a barrage of Allied explosives, the sturdy construction would not be demolished. And so, it was simply buried undern...

Show more

The Creation of Berlin Teufelsberg

The man-made rubble mound named Teufelsberg came into being after the Second World War. While many artificial hills were heaped up from the debris of West Berlin, Teufelsberg is unique by what is buried underneath; the never completed Nazi military technical college Wehrtechnische Fakultät, the beginnings as what was to be Welthauptstadt Germania (World Capital Germania). Despite a barrage of Allied explosives, the sturdy construction would not be demolished. And so, it was simply buried underneath approximately 400 000 demolished homes. Raising Teufelsberg to a height of 115 meters and winning it the title of the second highest point in Berlin, only surpassed by Kreuzberg.

Field Station Teufelsberg

This height was exploited in the late 1950’s by the NSA, who constructed one of its largest listening stations atop the Teufelsberg. Spying and surveillance were the orders of the day for the USA and UK, who regularly eavesdropped on Soviet, East German and other Warsaw Pact nations. And rumors whisper, also telephone calls of West Berlin citizens. Field Station Teufelsberg lost its raison d'être after the fall of the Berlin Wall. It was finally abandoned in 1991, leaving behind the buildings and radar domes.

A Thought for Exclusive Apartments

A group of investor saw an opportunity at the now vacant Teufelsberg, buying the former listening station from the City of Berlin (supposedly for a bargain price of 5.3 million) with the intention of building luxury apartments, a hotel and restaurant along with a spy-museum. However, living in the Cold War’s secret spy station atop the wreckage of Nazi Germany was not as appealing as many other lodgings produced by Berlin’s building boom. The Teufelsberg project was stillborn, incurring debts of over 50 million euros, and construction was aborted almost before it began.

The Failed Buyback

The City of Berlin attempted to buy back Teufelsberg, but the buyback offer of 500,000 euros was refused for being “almost indecently low”. The rejection was swiftly followed by a classification of the area, including Teufelsberg Field Station, as forest 2006. In one fell swoop revoking all building permits for the area. Teufelsberg Field Station was to be razed and the area reforested until the Green Party (of all people) stood to preserve Berlin’s biggest balls.

A University for an Invincible Germany

In 2007, Hollywood director David Lynch and his transcendental meditation teacher Raja Emanuel Schiffgens mounted the Teufelsberg plateau and supposedly placed the foundation stone for the construction of a new university. The University for an Invincible Germany was to feature a 50 meter high Tower of Invincibility to house some 1,000 students. The City of Berlin turned down the building proposal for some reason.

Other Ideas for the Cold War Relic

A group of internet-using veterans, nostalgic for the good old Cold War days, are promoting a website devoted to preserving the remains Teufelsberg as a memorial. Loudly bemoaning the damage caused to their beloved and beautiful spy station by vandals.

The Berlin Underground Society is eager to explore the carcass of the Nazi military academy, what they call the last undiscovered secret that underground Berlin has to offer.

While most recently in 2012, new investors have proposed a plan to build a viewing platform with a cafe, a tourist restaurant in the former cafeteria of the soldiers, loft apartment in the white domes, meeting rooms and a museum with a historic walk.

However, it is all talk and no action on all proposals. And today, Teufelsberg Field Station remain a vandalized and abandoned shell.

Show less

Opening hours

Always accessible

Time to visit

5 hours

Transport

S9, S75 to Heerstrasse or S7 to Grünewald

Address

Grunewald, 14193 Berlin, Germany