Why visit Berlin's Tiergarten Park

A sanctuary in the heart of bustling Berlin, Tiergarten park traverses the land from Brandenburg Gate to Kurfurstendamm, bisected by Berlin’s principal road Strasse des 17 Juni. Join the locals sunbaking on the large grass lawns and admire the english style landscaped gardens during the day or wander the forest paths lit by vintage gas lamps at night. Within it’s 600 acres of beautiful ground lies an array of statues and memorials, the Victory Column, Tiergarten Carilon, Schloss Bellevue, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, the Berlin Zoo and a couple of German beer gardens. Tiergarten park well suited for a leisurely stroll, but if you wish to see more, we recommend you hire a bike or pedal powered taxi.

Great to stretch your legs walking through the trees and autumn leaves - peaceful paths with just a few joggers and cyclists. Victory tower in the centre worth going up (fee) for excellent views.

Neil Thorpe, 11 Oct 2012, Scottland
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New Berlin Free Walking Tour

This 3.5 hour free walking tour is an ideal introduction to Berlin. Covering many of the main highlights it is both interesting and informative. Perfect for newcomers to the city.


Tiergarten Park history

A King’s Hunting Ground

The beginnings of Tiergarten, German for Animal Garden, can be traced back to 1527 when it was enclosed as private hunting grounds for the king and the electors of Brandenburg. Over a hundred years later in 1657, the first avenues and thruways were constructed. This began the movement which would transport Tiergarten from private grounds to public garden, culminating in 1743 when Friedrich the Great tore down the fence surrounding Tiergarten to formally established the park as communal space. This was aug...

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A King’s Hunting Ground

The beginnings of Tiergarten, German for Animal Garden, can be traced back to 1527 when it was enclosed as private hunting grounds for the king and the electors of Brandenburg. Over a hundred years later in 1657, the first avenues and thruways were constructed. This began the movement which would transport Tiergarten from private grounds to public garden, culminating in 1743 when Friedrich the Great tore down the fence surrounding Tiergarten to formally established the park as communal space. This was augmented with the addition of statues, a pheasant house, which would later become the core of the Zoological Garden, and other cultural symbols. In 1882, the monarchy formally abolished their rights to Tiergarten, adding boundaries to the district of Berlin so that the parkland would be preserved for the people.

Deforestation of Berlin Tiergarten Park

Tiergarten was decimated during World War II, through collateral bombings. In the years following the war, much of the park woodlands were cut down to served as firewood for the devastated city, the fields were turned into temporary farmland for vegetables and the resident animals slaughtered. This caused the once great forest to nearly disappear, with only 700 of the over 200,000 trees that once lined the Tiergarten park paths surviving.

Soviet War Memorial in Tiergarten Park

In 1945, almost directly after the fall of Berlin, the Soviets erected a monument to commemorate their fallen soldiers, in particularly those who died during the Battle of Berlin. It was positioned atop the burial site of 2,000 fallen Soviet soldiers in Tiergarten, which lay in the British sector. This position was also to be the location where Hitler meant to devote World Capital Germania.

The monument was isolated from those who commissioned it when the Berlin Wall was erected. Seen by many as a sign of communist provocation on West Berlin soil, throughout the Cold War it has to be protected by Soviet honour guards and British soldiers. However, even after the Wall was torn down, the Soviet War Memorial remains contentious, being vandalized just before Victory in Europe Day with red graffiti that red “thieves, murderers, rapists”.

Berlin Tiergarten Park’s Restoration

It was decided in 1949 to restore Tiergarten as a tranquil parkland, mimicking the pre-war landscape architecture. Over the course of 10 years, 250,000 saplings were delivered from all over Germany, some even being delivered by plane during the Berlin Blockade.

Tiergarten received a status as a garden memorial to the city of Berlin, and in 1991, encroachment of new buildings onto the Tiergarten lands was made illegal. Today, with 520 acres, Tiergarten remains the second largest urban public park in Berlin (after Tempelhof).

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Opening hours

Always accessible

Time to visit

2 hours

Transport

S5, S7, S9, S25 to Tiergarten, U8, S1, S2, S25 to Brandenburg Gate

Address

Strasse des 17. Juni 100, 10557 Berlin, Germany